Tag Archives: security
SpyFiles: Wikileaks claims $5B industry spying on mobile, webmail, GPS users, delivers interactive map showing surveillance by country.

SpyFiles.org — Wikileaks Reveals Industry Spying on Cell Phones, Webmail, GPS Users

SpyFiles: Wikileaks claims $5B industry spying on mobile, webmail, GPS users, delivers interactive map showing surveillance by country.
An Android app developer has published what he says is conclusive proof that millions of smartphones are secretly monitoring the key presses, geographic locations, and received messages of its users.

BUSTED! Secret app on millions of phones logs key taps

An Android app developer has published what he says is conclusive proof that millions of smartphones are secretly monitoring the key presses, geographic locations, and received messages of its users.
From January 2011 <strong>Consumer Reports</strong>, "With landline phones, operators were significantly more likely to find callers by determining the location of the phone. More than one-third of landline users were located in that manner compared with only 7 percent of cell callers. Landline phones give the operator your home address, including an apartment number if it appears on your phone bill. With cellular phones, operators see only geographic coordinates."

Emergency Responders Need Landlines

From January 2011 Consumer Reports, "With landline phones, operators were significantly more likely to find callers by determining the location of the phone. More than one-third of landline users were located in that manner compared with only 7 percent of cell callers. Landline phones give the operator your home address, including an apartment number if it appears on your phone bill. With cellular phones, operators see only geographic coordinates."
Late last week, the Federal Aviation Administration alerted pilots that “the GPS signal may be unreliable or unavailable” within a nearly 300-mile radius of Boulder City, where the test transmitter will be located, from 11 p.m. to 5 a.m. local time daily from Monday to May 27.

Nellis Air Force Base has plans for two military exercises during the period in which the testing is to take place involving air support units that rely on the use of GPS technology.

“Anything that affects operations is of concern,” said Nellis spokesman Charles Ramey. “We rely heavily on GPS to accomplish our mission.”

"Flight attendants tell you to turn off your cellphones and your Kindles and whatever else because it may interfere the plane's electronics ... and yet I got this notice from FAA that somebody is going to do exactly the same thing, which is interfere with the navigation of the airplane," said John Gadzinski, an airline captain and aviation safety consultant.

FAA Warns Las Vegas Air Force Base, Pilots & Drivers 4G May Jam GPS

Late last week, the Federal Aviation Administration alerted pilots that “the GPS signal may be unreliable or unavailable” within a nearly 300-mile radius of Boulder City, where the test transmitter will be located, from 11 p.m. to 5 a.m. local time daily from Monday to May 27. Nellis Air Force Base has plans for two military exercises during the period in which the testing is to take place involving air support units that rely on the use of GPS technology. “Anything that affects operations is of concern,” said Nellis spokesman Charles Ramey. “We rely heavily on GPS to accomplish our mission.” "Flight attendants tell you to turn off your cellphones and your Kindles and whatever else because it may interfere the plane's electronics ... and yet I got this notice from FAA that somebody is going to do exactly the same thing, which is interfere with the navigation of the airplane," said John Gadzinski, an airline captain and aviation safety consultant.
The device - dubbed MEDUSA (Mob Excess Deterrent Using Silent Audio) - exploits the microwave audio effect, in which short microwave pulses rapidly heat tissue, causing a shockwave inside the skull that can be detected by the ears. A series of pulses can be transmitted to produce recognisable sounds.

The device is aimed for military or crowd-control applications, but may have other uses.

"But is it going to be possible at the power levels necessary?" he asks. Previous microwave audio tests involved very "quiet" sounds that were hard to hear, a high-power system would mean much more powerful - and potentially hazardous - shock waves.

"I would worry about what other health effects it is having," says Lin. "You might see neural damage."

Sierra Nevada says that a demonstration version could be built in a year, with a transportable system following within 18 months. They are currently seeking funding for the work from the US Department of Defence.

Microwave ray gun controls crowds with noise

The device - dubbed MEDUSA (Mob Excess Deterrent Using Silent Audio) - exploits the microwave audio effect, in which short microwave pulses rapidly heat tissue, causing a shockwave inside the skull that can be detected by the ears. A series of pulses can be transmitted to produce recognisable sounds. The device is aimed for military or crowd-control applications, but may have other uses. "But is it going to be possible at the power levels necessary?" he asks. Previous microwave audio tests involved very "quiet" sounds that were hard to hear, a high-power system would mean much more powerful - and potentially hazardous - shock waves. "I would worry about what other health effects it is having," says Lin. "You might see neural damage." Sierra Nevada says that a demonstration version could be built in a year, with a transportable system following within 18 months. They are currently seeking funding for the work from the US Department of Defence.
<h4>A leading computer scientist has warned of the security risks of using smart meters in controlling utility supplies.</h4>
<p>A programme is underway to replace Britain$#8217;s 47 million meters with  smart meters that can be turned off remotely. Utilities welcome the move  because it will greatly simplify the process of collecting meter  reading and controlling supply at times of high demand. As an added  bonus the technology also makes it easier to switch subscribers to new  (higher) tariffs if they persistently fail to pay their bill on time.</p>

Smart meters pose hacker kill-switch risk, warn boffins

A leading computer scientist has warned of the security risks of using smart meters in controlling utility supplies.

A programme is underway to replace Britain$#8217;s 47 million meters with smart meters that can be turned off remotely. Utilities welcome the move because it will greatly simplify the process of collecting meter reading and controlling supply at times of high demand. As an added bonus the technology also makes it easier to switch subscribers to new (higher) tariffs if they persistently fail to pay their bill on time.